Triple Your Customers’ Joy! Part Two: The final piece of the ‘Value Jigsaw’.

The visitors have left the building! What happens next?

In Part One of this guest blog post series we looked at ways to build anticipation for your customers to maximise the value you give even before you meet them in person.

Today I want you to think about what happens after your visitors have gone back home. How can you keep your relationship going and entice them to return again?

Better customer feedback management could boost revenue by £2bn

In a new report, Barclays predicts that if businesses become more responsive to online feedback the hospitality and leisure sector can add £2bn to the UK economy with the impact on the supply chain contributing a further £1.2bn.

Add that to the 2015 report, by workforce charity People 1st, showing that a 1% uplift in productivity could generate £1.4bn of extra revenue, and it is plain that there’s more upside than downside for organisations that focus on Customer Experience.

Do You Know What Your Customer Experience is Costing You?

I visited a museum at the weekend – just scraping in on the last day of a heavily-promoted, blockbuster exhibition.

As I waited at the ticket desk, I noticed that, despite there being a queue, only one team member was selling tickets – and yet there were four team members behind that desk. Two of the other three were having a chat; the other was (there’s no other word for it) slumped in her chair, staring into space.

The exhibition was great – I’d recommend it to you, but it’s over!

Also over is the massive opportunity the museum had to maximise its return on investment…

“The Most Precious Heritage of Mankind”

I recently presented a case study at an international tourism conference in Zagreb: the theme was Heritage Tourism: How is it Adapting to the New World? and was based in part on an interview I conducted with Robin Worsnop, the founder and CEO of Rabbie’s Small Group Tours and chairman of the Edinburgh Tourism Action Group.

The interview explored Robin’s perspective as a tour operator, and as one of the leaders responsible for developing Edinburgh’s visitor economy. It was a fascinating interview and instructive for any tourism or heritage professional. I reproduce it in full here:

And so To Bed… Laku noć Zagreb

As I prepare to leave Zagreb, I’m excited at the prospect of returning soon, to work with new partners to help Croatia and the Balkan states to realise their potential. It takes hard work, it takes commitment, it takes creativity; but above all it takes a fundamental belief that, regardless of cultural differences, regardless of historical and bureaucratic hindrances, we human beings were put on this Earth to celebrate the miracle of our existence, and to collaborate in order to progress the betterment of our human condition.

Project STARS: Turn Your “Payroll Cost” Into Realised Potential

As I’ve said before, businesses need to become adept at delivering memorable, differentiated and personalised experiences – there truly isn’t any alternative (not even in online, or via increased deployment of technology). To do that, businesses must stop measuring only costs, and start measuring potential. Productivity doesn’t mean doing more with less, it means doing more with what you have.

In other words, this is about focusing and energising the whole organisation: becoming truly customer-centric; becoming truly people-centred. Machines don’t buy from you, people do. And first, they buy the experience you create.

Let’s keep it simple: I have a model to share that encompasses the five primary elements
of a consumer facing business – the STARS model.