7 Essential Steps to Making Customer Experience Your Competitive Advantage

In a world where “experts” are derided, “truth” has become “post-truth” and “news” has become “fake news”, how do organisations become trusted partners with their customers?

In 2017, information has never been more readily available, and yet less trusted, by consumers. The 2016 Edelman Trust Barometer shows that just 28 per cent of Britons say they trust business leaders – and 59% would prefer a computer algorithm chose news for them than a human editor!

So, what should organisations do, to survive, and thrive, in this most competitive and unpredictable environment?

All You Need for 2017

My first newsletter of 2017 has a new look and a new focus. It’s inspired by a quotation given to me by my friend, futurist Nick Price:

“Customer Experience isn’t simply the quality & arrangement of assets. It’s their orchestration.”

So this month’s newsletter reflects three aspects of my mission:

“I help organisations orchestrate their assets so that everyone and everything plays to their full potential.”

Is there a Bear in Your Boardroom?

In the House of Commons, following Prime Minister Theresa May’s most detailed speech to date on her government’s Brexit strategy, Conservative MP Nicholas Soames (despite being a strong Remain supporter) says it is time to accept the verdict of the referendum and “get on with it”.

He quotes his grandfather Winston Churchill: “If there is a bear in your bedroom it is not a matter for speculation.”

The simple wisdom of this statement – as well as the refreshing humour – resonates through time.

If you have a bear (an unwanted, unwelcome, and potentially dangerous intruder) in your bedroom (or boardroom), sometimes it just takes an outside observer to say “I see you have a bear in there. What are you going to do about it?”

The Future of the Experience Economy: Managing Risk in Risky Times

In a world where the unthinkable and the impossible are rapidly becoming the reality, the challenges for organisations and businesses are also the opportunities. The key is to understand the trends, stay focused on vision, mission and key success drivers, and to implement flexible strategies based on what will happen, what could happen, and above all, on what you want to happen.

This is the third and last of my short series of posts, distilling insights from the conference I attended on On Wednesday 15th June : The Future of the Experience Economy, organised by Eventbrite.

Three Business Lessons I Learned From Gardeners’ World

At BBC Gardeners’ World Live the first celebrity masterclass I attended was delivered by Joe Swift, a professional garden designer, writer and broadcaster who has been a regular presenter on the BBC Gardeners’ World programme for 18 years.

The theme of the well-attended session was “Garden Design for the Enthusiastic Amateur” (my description) – so of course I listened intently. As I did so, however, I learned much more than I was expecting, and not just about gardening. It’s perhaps no surprise that more than one author has used a garden as a metaphor for “growing” a business; however, stick with me.

“The Only Dentist I’ve Ever Looked Forward to Visiting”

As I returned to the reception desk I noticed an open visitors’ book. The comments were overwhelmingly positive – words such as “communication” and “explanation” jumped out, as did the comment of my title: “The only dentist I’ve ever looked forward to visiting.”

Wow!!

Was it a coincidence that my dentist (also the practice head, as it turns out) is focused on the Patient Journey as a continuous experience – from website/telephone to reception to waiting room to treatment room and back to reception – and that this practice is receiving such rave reviews (no doubt leading to plenty of upsells and recommendations)?