Are You an Icon?

The power of image was shown at its strongest this week, when the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge posed for photographs in front of the Taj Mahal, on the very bench where, 24 years earlier, William’s mother Diana had created one of the most iconic images ever of a failing marriage.

A picture is worth a thousand words.

I’m not saying that you, or your business, are or needs to be “iconic”.

That said, I wonder what you could do to make your business more memorable?

Three Ways to Know Customers Better

I’ve just read an interesting article about how Top Shop is using technology to redesign its stores based on customers’ use of smartphones. Apparently “the system will allow retailers, shopping centres and other venues to gain easier access to customer movement data and to more effectively monetise their assets”. OK – so that’s one way to know Customers better: as some supermarket chains are also doing, you can use technology to monitor their movements, and what, and when, they buy. Then you can realign your store accordingly.

The problem with that approach, is that you will learn what they buy, but not why they buy.

Customer Experience: Send in the Robots?

In a week when a new survey suggests that Sales and Retail Assistants are “95% likely” to be replaced by robots, I’d suggest that whilst technology has its place in facilitating the Customer Experience, there is (or should be) no substitute for human interaction. My vision for what that interaction should look like is displayed on the homepage of my website: “The wave of enthusiasm from a team of people in love with what they do, who have created a sensational stage for their product, and who can’t wait to attend to every customer desire as they facilitate the ultimate buying experience”

Whilst retailers scratch their heads as they contemplate the impact of the new National Living Wage, and struggle to justify the running costs across their sprawling property portfolios, the answer is staring them in the face…

How to Sell More Books

My philosophy on how to sell more of something is simple: you have to explain what it is, you have to make it look desirable, and you have to ensure that it creates an appropriate impact on your Customer.

One of my hobbyhorses is that most visitor attractions fail to maximise sales of guidebooks because they don’t follow this simple approach.

The key principle is to get the timing right. Whenever I’ve been involved in designing shops, cafes or visitor centres I’ve ensured that signature products have pride of place, in a prime location with point of sale that is written from the Customer’s point of view.