How to Make a Retail Success

I’ve wanted to share my Customer Experience philosophy, and in particular how I learned it through a series of adventures in retail, for many years. I’m delighted to have had the opportunity to do so in a recent interview with Museums + Heritage Advisor magazine, which you can read here.

7 Essential Steps to Making Customer Experience Your Competitive Advantage

In a world where “experts” are derided, “truth” has become “post-truth” and “news” has become “fake news”, how do organisations become trusted partners with their customers?

In 2017, information has never been more readily available, and yet less trusted, by consumers. The 2016 Edelman Trust Barometer shows that just 28 per cent of Britons say they trust business leaders – and 59% would prefer a computer algorithm chose news for them than a human editor!

So, what should organisations do, to survive, and thrive, in this most competitive and unpredictable environment?

They Don’t Make ’em Like That Any More

“[Sir Ken Morrison] showed us all the importance of aiming high but never forgetting the practicalities of life and the humanity of those we deal with.”

These words encapsulate the essence of great retailing, great business and great Customer Experience. Ken Morrison was an innovator – for example he built Morrisons on a model of vertical integration, directly controlling many of its food suppliers, and developed the Market Street concept of retail theatre combined with expertise directly available to the consumer.

All You Need for 2017

My first newsletter of 2017 has a new look and a new focus. It’s inspired by a quotation given to me by my friend, futurist Nick Price:

“Customer Experience isn’t simply the quality & arrangement of assets. It’s their orchestration.”

So this month’s newsletter reflects three aspects of my mission:

“I help organisations orchestrate their assets so that everyone and everything plays to their full potential.”

What Andy Murray’s Wimbledon Victory Tells Us About Coaching

What a glorious contrast to recent weeks of doom and gloom was Andy Murray’s second Wimbledon triumph!

Perhaps the most fascinating aspect of Murray’s victory was his relationship with his enigmatic coach, eight-times Grand Slam title winner Ivan Lendl. Without Lendl in his corner, Murray’s dedication and hard work have made him the second-best tennis player in the world, and arguably the best Britain has produced; reunited with Lendl, his tennis reached a new level in the 2016 Wimbledon Final.