Customer Experience: What We Need Now is People Being Nice to One Another

Well it’s been quite a few days here in the UK: there are more questions than answers, and uncertainty – that enemy of business confidence and growth – seems set to be with us for at least the next few months, if not years.

So what should business do for the best?

I had two experiences last week that showed, simply yet dramatically, where business’ focus should be over the foreseeable future: on engaging and empowering people to deliver memorable Customer Experiences.

10 Lessons for Entrepreneurs, from LinkedIn Co-founder Reid Hoffman

I was fortunate enough to be present at Saïd Business School on Sunday, to hear LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman in conversation with Dean Peter Tufano. At the start of the session, Dean Tufano announced that Hoffman, who studied philosophy at Oxford, is donating $1m to help fund The Oxford Foundry, a new hub for future student entrepreneurs from across Oxford.

Starting on such a positive note, the ensuing hour was packed with insights and takeaways for entrepreneurs and business leaders. Here is my Top 10:

Project STARS: Turn Your “Payroll Cost” Into Realised Potential

As I’ve said before, businesses need to become adept at delivering memorable, differentiated and personalised experiences – there truly isn’t any alternative (not even in online, or via increased deployment of technology). To do that, businesses must stop measuring only costs, and start measuring potential. Productivity doesn’t mean doing more with less, it means doing more with what you have.

In other words, this is about focusing and energising the whole organisation: becoming truly customer-centric; becoming truly people-centred. Machines don’t buy from you, people do. And first, they buy the experience you create.

Let’s keep it simple: I have a model to share that encompasses the five primary elements
of a consumer facing business – the STARS model.