Tag Archive: Branding

All You Need for 2017

My first newsletter of 2017 has a new look and a new focus. It’s inspired by a quotation given to me by my friend, futurist Nick Price:

“Customer Experience isn’t simply the quality & arrangement of assets. It’s their orchestration.”

So this month’s newsletter reflects three aspects of my mission:

“I help organisations orchestrate their assets so that everyone and everything plays to their full potential.”

My Advice to the Yorkshire Dales ‘Shopkeeper from Hell’

A shop owner in the Yorkshire Dales has been branded “the bookseller from hell” after his local parish council took in more than 20 complaints about his alleged rudeness. Steve Bloom charges customers 50p… Continue reading

Marks & Spencer : Is it time to split the retailer in two? 

In this article, City AM’s deputy editor Julian Harris argues that one of the UK High Street’s most iconic retailers needs radical surgery: perhaps even splitting its booming food business from its struggling fashion… Continue reading

Six Trends Redefining the Customer Experience

I was delighted to be asked to write this guest post for the Eventbrite blog.

My post shares six key trends that are redefining the customer experience – specifically in the conference and live events sector although these are mega-trends and therefore relevant to every business.

The Future of the Experience Economy: Managing Risk in Risky Times

In a world where the unthinkable and the impossible are rapidly becoming the reality, the challenges for organisations and businesses are also the opportunities. The key is to understand the trends, stay focused on vision, mission and key success drivers, and to implement flexible strategies based on what will happen, what could happen, and above all, on what you want to happen.

This is the third and last of my short series of posts, distilling insights from the conference I attended on On Wednesday 15th June : The Future of the Experience Economy, organised by Eventbrite.

Three Customer Loyalty Drivers in the Experience Economy

This is my second post sharing insights from the conference, The Future of the Experience Economy, that took place in London on 15th June 2016, organised by Eventbrite.

I’m going to share three key takeaways from the session on Brand, Loyalty and Consumer Expectations. This panel discussion went to the heart of what every customer-facing organisation needs to know:

The Future of the Experience Economy, by Eventbrite’s CEO

This week I attended a conference, The Future of the Experience Economy, to discuss and learn how to succeed in the Experience Economy, what innovations will drive it forward, and how progressive brands can stay ahead of the curve to create incredible experiences that build loyal audiences.

Over the next few days I’ll publish some short posts sharing some of the highlights. Up first: Julia Hartz, CEO and Co-founder of Eventbrite, a global marketplace for live experiences that allows people to find and create events in 190 countries.

The Blues, the Loos, the Zoos, the Booze: It’s the Customer Experience News!

My newsletter this month was updated – literally a “Stop Press” moment – to reflect the incredible story of Leicester City’s achievement in winning the English Premier League. Pretty magnanimous of me, I feel, as a Spurs fan for most of my life!

Leicester’s story, and as importantly, their brand of lightning-fast, counter-attacking football, have captured the nation’s imagination, and in doing so, perfectly reflect the attributes of a POSITIVE Customer Experience…

So, Here’s My Idea for BHS

So what is my idea for BHS?

Well, the clue’s in the name: British Home Stores. Yes, it sounds a bit old-fashioned; however that’s because BHS has done little to shift our perception of a brand stuck in the 1970s, or the 1980s at best.

My starting point is that “British Home Stores” could be a blank canvas for a new conceptBritish Retail in department store retailing – a store that literally offers the best British products for your home. Here I agree with Mary Portas when she offers a vision of a market place, showcasing “young British makers or designers” alongside cool fashion at keen prices.

Are You an Icon?

The power of image was shown at its strongest this week, when the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge posed for photographs in front of the Taj Mahal, on the very bench where, 24 years earlier, William’s mother Diana had created one of the most iconic images ever of a failing marriage.

A picture is worth a thousand words.

I’m not saying that you, or your business, are or needs to be “iconic”.

That said, I wonder what you could do to make your business more memorable?