Triple Your Customers’ Joy! Part Two: The final piece of the ‘Value Jigsaw’.

The visitors have left the building! What happens next?

In Part One of this guest blog post series you can read more about ways to buildemailphoto anticipation for your customers to maximise the value you give even before you meet them in person.

Whatever happens before they cross the threshold of your physical premises can all play a significant part in their experience of your organisation. Potentially this could form up to a third of the value they receive from you – if you play your cards right. Another third could be received during their actual visit – and an expert like Stephen is better than placed than me to help with this part of the journey. The third and final piece of the ‘value jigsaw’ can fall into place after your visitors have ‘left the building’, so-to-speak, and returned to whence they came.

Today I want you to think about what happens after your visitors have gone back home. How can you keep your relationship going and entice them to return again? How can you help them enjoy the memories of their joyful experience with you for years to come? Are there ways in which you can continue to engage them from afar?

Here are some ideas you could apply in your organisation:

  • Say Thank You

A simple ‘Thank You For Visiting’ email or letter can be an effective way to help your IMG_2099visitors feel appreciated. These kind of messages can see much higher levels of engagement than other marketing communications. It’s even more likely to be effective if you can personalise it to include a special mention of a particular aspect of their visit which you know they will have liked (e.g. the children’s facilities if you know they bought a family ticket).

  • Ask For Online Reviews

Most of you will have some kind of visitor feedback data collection in place for your own internal monitoring. But are you making the most of social media and review websites where you can encourage customers to leave feedback about their visits?

  • Recommend A Friend

If your visitor data shows that customers are unlikely to make a return visit any time soon, perhaps you could extend an offer to encourage them to send a friend along instead. You could run a promotional voucher scheme which allows you to leverage your customers’ social networks, and helps them to feel generous by gifting their contacts with a special deal to a place they have enjoyed visiting.

  • Invite Them Back

Beyond a sign at your exit points saying ‘Goodbye We Hope You’ll Visit Us Again Soon’ – do you actually take steps to invite your visitors to return? You w2016-06-19 13.33.27ill need to look at your booking data to understand attendance patterns, so you can tailor a particular offer or message to make the best impact. For example, if most people visit once a year, you might be wasting your time trying to get them to come back next week, but an invitation for six months’ time may be more realistic.

  • Save Space for Souvenirs

Yes you probably have a whole gift shop of items you want people to buy and take
home, but are there other ‘free gifts’ and photo opportunities you can create to help visitors remember their experience? How about a ‘selfie-spot’ where customers can take snaps to upload to social media which show clearly where they are (so you can benefit from the exposure).

These are just a few suggestions to get you thinking – what are you doing already? What can you do next?


Anwen Cooper is the creator of Get Fruitful Marketing, a programme that helps people realiseemail logo their potential to grow more passion-fuelled, principled and profitable businesses. Anwen has worked with more than 70 different organisations over the past 15 years, including many of London’s leading arts and cultural venues, and helped drive record-breaking sales through the height of the 08/09 recession. She is the author of the forthcoming Get Fruitful Marketing – The Playbook. You can find out more and get fruitful marketing insights at getfruitfulmarketing.com and on Twitter @getfruitfulnow.

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